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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 1:43 pm 
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Location: Dovercourt ,Harwich,U.K.
I have always been in to tropical plants but bamboo just got a hold of me, shooting season is like Christmas for me, but at what point does a collection become a obsession, I would love to know what other collectors think and have

Bashania fargesii

Borinda papyrifera CS1046

Chimonobambusa marmorea 'Variegata'
Chimonobambusa quadrangularis 'Suow'
chimonobambusa tumidissinoda 'Addington'

Chusquea culeou 'Aisen'
Chusquea gigantea

Fargesia dracocephala 'Rufa'
Fargesia Fungosa 'chocolate '
Fargesia gaolinensis
Fargesia murieliae
Fargesia nitida 'black pearl'
Fargesia nitida 'Gansu 95 A' “Jürgen “
Fargesia nitida 'Jiuzhaigou'
Fargesia papyrifera 'blue'
Fargesia robusta 'Pingwu'
Fargesia robusta 'Wolong'
Fargesia scabrida 'Asian wonder'
Fargesia Yunnanensis

Hibanobambusa tranquillans 'Shiroshima'

Himalayacalamus falconeri 'Damarapa'

Indocalamus tessellatus

Phyllostachys atrovaginata

Phyllostachys aurea
Phyllostachys aurea 'Albovariegata'
Phyllostachys aurea 'Flavescens-inversa'
Phyllostachys aurea 'Holochrysa'
Phyllostachys aurea 'Koi'

Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Alata'
Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'argus'
Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Aureocaulis'
Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Harbin Inversa'
Phyllostachys aureosulcata 'Spectabilis'

Phyllostachys bambusoides 'Allgold'
Phyllostachys bambusoides 'Castillon Inversa'
Phyllostachys bambusoides 'Castillon'

Phyllostachys bissetii

Phyllostachys dulcis

Phyllostachys edulis
Phyllostachys edulis mixta

Phyllostachys fimbriligula

Phyllostachys flexuosa 'Kimmei-Inversa Cornelia d'Alba'
Phyllostachys glauca
Phyllostachys glauca 'Yunzhu'

Phyllostachys heteroclada

Phyllostachys humilis

Phyllostachys incarnata

Phyllostachys iridescens
Phyllostachys Iridescens heterochroma

Phyllostachys lofushanensis

Phyllostachys nidularia

Phyllostachys nigra
Phyllostachys nigra 'Bory'
Phyllostachys nigra 'Henon'
Phyllostachys nigra 'Megurochiku'
Phyllostachys nigra 'Punctata'
Phyllostachys Nigra variegata

Phyllostachys parvifolia

Phyllostachys praecox 'Viridisulcata'

phyllostachys primotina

Phyllostachys prominens

Phyllostachys rubromarginata

Phyllostachys Shanghai 3

Phyllostachys stimulosa

Phyllostachys Tianmuensis

Phyllostachys violascens

Phyllostachys viridiglaucescens

Phyllostachys viridis 'Robert Young'

Phyllostachys vivax
Phyllostachys vivax 'Aureocaulis'
Phyllostachys vivax 'Huangwenzhu Inversa'
Phyllostachys vivax 'Huangwenzhu'

Pseudosasa japonica
Pseudosasa japonica 'Tsutsumiana'


Sasaella masamuneana 'Albostriata'

Semiarundinaria fastuosa
Semiarundinaria yashadake 'Kimmei'

Thamnocalamus crassinodus Lang tang
Thamnocalamus crassinodus 'Kew Beauty'


Last edited by Deane on Wed Feb 21, 2018 6:35 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 3:12 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 20, 2013 3:48 pm
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Location: Comox,BC
Lovely collection.

Even if it’s an obsession I think it’s fine as long as it doesn’t interfere with family / health/ work. It’s far better being addicted to buying Bamboo then using drugs or drinking in excess.

I know I find my garden and plant obsessions a place to get away from the fast pace of everyday life and my hectic job I do. I enjoy more time outside because of it and I have even read studies saying that playing in the dirt helps build the immune system.

You know me well and I’m really not one to judge obsession over collection but that’s just my 2 cents.


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 4:12 pm 
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Location: Dovercourt ,Harwich,U.K.
Van-isle-bamboo wrote:
Lovely collection.

Even if it’s an obsession I think it’s fine as long as it doesn’t interfere with family / health/ work. It’s far better being addicted to buying Bamboo then using drugs or drinking in excess.

I know I find my garden and plant obsessions a place to get away from the fast pace of everyday life and my hectic job I do. I enjoy more time outside because of it and I have even read studies saying that playing in the dirt helps build the immune system.

You know me well and I’m really not one to judge obsession over collection but that’s just my 2 cents.
lol It don’t interfere with family but my wife does give me the look when I talk about it and says “all look the same to me “


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 21, 2018 10:03 pm 
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Location: St. Louis area Location Details
I think for most of us it goes from collection to obsession before it settles back down into collection again. :)

I wish I could grow Fargesia (more than just Rufa) -- you have a nice selection of those!

You need to look at more Indocalamus though, as I. longiauriitus and I. sp. 'Solidus' are both so attractive to my eye.

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My blog: It's not work, it's gardening!


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:37 am 
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Posts: 1181
Location: Island off Cape Cod Massacusetts
Try to focus on the varieties that will thrive in your location, not so much the ones on listed "might be in limits of hardiness zone".

Be realistic about how much space you have to grow boo. The big runners need some room to reach their full potential. Better to have a few well chosen ones than a mixed root bound mat.

I believe you are in the UK, so like me, you are at higher longitude than your temperature hardiness zone would be for inland locations. Hours per year of sunlight are a factor in growing some boos.

If you are just starting out, and have limited space, choose varieties you like that you can see examples of doing well in your area.

As with any collection, quality matters more than quantity.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:02 am 
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Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
Deane wrote:
I have always been in to tropical plants but bamboo just got a hold of me, shooting season is like Christmas for me, but at what point does a collection become a obsession, I would love to know what other collectors think and have'

I understand what you are saying. I have been what I call a "serious gardener" for my entire life, but I did not discover bamboos until my mid 20's. Since then, I have continued to collect about any plants that I can grow, but bamboos have certainly become one of my favorite plant groups. All things considered, I believe them to be about the most rewarding group of plants that I can grow. They grow quickly, tolerate adversity, and are very aesthetically pleasing.

To echo an earlier post, there are many worse things with which one can be obsessed. As long as it does not become destructive to your life, or the lives of those around you, I do not see a problem. In fact, many gardeners see their love of plants as a way to reach out and help to improve the lives of people around them. We all have our own gifts, and I see no reason to view your passion in a negative light, just because it is a little out of the mainstream.

As to my list....I have quite a few varieties, mostly Phyllostachys and Bambusa, but I have never written out a complete list. I guess I should do that!

I wish I could grow some of those "mountain bamboos" that you have. With my Bambusa species, every time we get a cold spell predicted, I have to start sweating :D . I would like to have some clumping bamboos that could tolerate cold!


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:08 am 
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Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
Deane wrote:
lol It don’t interfere with family but my wife does give me the look when I talk about it and says “all look the same to me “
It sounds like she needs to look at those plants a little longer, and they will start to look different to her too. :D


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 7:32 am 
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Location: Austria
dependable wrote:
...

Be realistic about how much space you have to grow boo. ...


There is so much wisdom in these words.


In the beginning I was also obsessed about having as many rare phyllostachys as possible.
Now, a few years down the line, I still have the itch to get something new but looking at plants like vivax finally sizing up makes me realize there is simply no way to give new plantings the space they deserve.

Sure, you can keep your plants small and confined but a) its a lot of work and b) they will never reach their full beauty and potential

After having visited shunan zhuhai last year my perspective changed even more. The beauty of a fully mature moso grove is surely a sight to remember.
I'd rather have one mature large grove of phyllostachys than several small plants.

Of course, if you have the space nothing can stop you ;)


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:54 am 
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Alan_L wrote:
I think for most of us it goes from collection to obsession before it settles back down into collection again. :)

I wish I could grow Fargesia (more than just Rufa) -- you have a nice selection of those!

You need to look at more Indocalamus though, as I. longiauriitus and I. sp. 'Solidus' are both so attractive to my eye.

Yes Alan your probably right I collected vintage port years ago and it became a bit of a obsession now it sits in my cellar collecting dust , Indocalamus is a fine species


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 10:56 am 
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Glen wrote:
Deane wrote:
lol It don’t interfere with family but my wife does give me the look when I talk about it and says “all look the same to me “
It sounds like she needs to look at those plants a little longer, and they will start to look different to her too. :D

Don’t ... I think she does it to annoy me now lol


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:04 am 
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Glen wrote:
Deane wrote:
As to my list....I have quite a few varieties, mostly Phyllostachys and Bambusa, but I have never written out a complete list. I guess I should do that!

There is a plant list on everybody’s profile on here but not many use it, I find it very helpful


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 11:12 am 
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dependable wrote:
Try to focus on the varieties that will thrive in your location, not so much the ones on listed "might be in limits of hardiness zone".

Be realistic about how much space you have to grow boo. The big runners need some room to reach their full potential. Better to have a few well chosen ones than a mixed root bound mat.

I believe you are in the UK, so like me, you are at higher longitude than your temperature hardiness zone would be for inland locations. Hours per year of sunlight are a factor in growing some boos.

If you are just starting out, and have limited space, choose varieties you like that you can see examples of doing well in your area.

As with any collection, quality matters more than quantity.

I understand where your coming from at first I wanted as many of Phyllostachys as I could get but now I have become more selective, I have quite a good climate here living on a coastal peninsula,as for space I have to rent land at the moment but the plan is to sell up and buy a house with land like a small holding, I would eventually like to open my garden to public


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 12:55 pm 
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Location: Island off Cape Cod Massacusetts
OK, I do wish you luck, I admit to being obsessed at first too, and my wife used to roll her eyes as well, the eye rolling stopped when I started installing groves for others for good money.

For recommendations specific for you list, I'd add fargesia denudata, a lovely bright green plant with fine leaves and a graceful habit. I'd watch out for psudosasa japonica, it can look good in a concentrated stand, but will tend to run around and get into everything after a while. Also, I collected a few types of p japonica, and can barely tell them apart, if at all.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:41 pm 
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Location: Comox,BC
All excellent responses and I’ll be considering lots of the suggestions myself.

For me I’ve opted to go for collecting the super rare ones now. Rare for Canada I guess and the USA as well. Europe seems to be inundated with amaing Bamboo. Over the pond here it’s a battle to find anything unusual.

Clumppers have been a amajor part in my last few collections and I’m still after some runners but that’s going to take a year getting all my import papaerwork set up.

Hey the dusty port collection sounds great though!


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 22, 2018 2:59 pm 
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dependable wrote:
OK, I do wish you luck, I admit to being obsessed at first too, and my wife used to roll her eyes as well, the eye rolling stopped when I started installing groves for others for good money.

For recommendations specific for you list, I'd add fargesia denudata, a lovely bright green plant with fine leaves and a graceful habit. I'd watch out for psudosasa japonica, it can look good in a concentrated stand, but will tend to run around and get into everything after a while. Also, I collected a few types of p japonica, and can barely tell them apart, if at all.

Oh yes I have seen Pseudosasa japonica run riot in gardens , as for looking the same I am sure your right, The only Pseudosasa japonica I will add is Pseudosasa japonica sp. Charles as it looks quite different Very, “very interesting upright growing bamboo that looks like Sem. fastuosa but it is much more graceful, a very interesting new bamboo” which Fargesia denudata would you recommend


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