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PostPosted: Thu Jan 11, 2018 12:37 am 
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Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
Posts: 105
Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
pokenei wrote:
After consecutive weeks with highs of -10s and lows of -20s (-30 at its lowest + windchill), there's finally a break. +2 high today. Talking in degrees Celsius.

I am pretty sure all leaves are fried, but seeing the leaves partially uncurl today gives a tiny bit of joy and false hope. Realistically, the best I'm hoping for is that my bamboos can partially releaf in June, but top kill is expected.


That is cold, good luck.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 15, 2018 9:38 pm 
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Posts: 29
Location: Cambridge, MA
Ophiuchus wrote:
Temp got down to 20F and the pots still look dried out. My damage is done, so I'm going to water the foliage again to remove ice and shut off asap to give time to dry before temps drop again.
Only water when above 40 degrees Fahrenheit at mid-day.

It is really hard finding authoritative info on this topic, but when I searched a while ago the most frequent thing I found was that suggestion.
Colorado State University Extension - Fall and Winter Watering wrote:
Watering Guidelines

Water only when air temperatures are above 40 degrees F. Apply water at mid-day so it will have time to soak in before possible freezing at night.

Plants receiving reflected heat from buildings, walls and fences are more subject to damage. The low angle of winter sun makes this more likely on south or west exposures. Windy sites result in faster drying of plants and require additional water.

Monitor weather conditions and water during extended dry periods without snow cover – one to two times per month.

Click here for full article.

From bamboocraft.net forums, this looks like why 40F might be the watering point - below that, and maybe the Bamboo won't use the water due to dormancy:
stevelau1911 wrote:
Bamboos don't need any light at all when the soil temperatures drop below 40F because they will move into dormancy so it is fine to cover them up. I wouldn't use burlap though because it doesn't hold in heat. Photosynthesis wouldn't happen anyways when it gets that cold so 100% darkness is OK.

The best way to tarp in zones 4-6 is to bend the culms down to the ground and put a plastic sheet over them. Pool liners, carpets, or even blankets should work too. Here's a better thread with more proven over-wintering techniques.

Click here for full thread.

IMHO the to-the-ground or plastic-wrap is too ugly for Bamboo visible from public walkways; after my recent experience with topkill I'm planning on doing something artistic with $5 8ft clear acrylic tubes and thick copper wire to hold the tubes upright with several culms next year, to see if that will let some culm's leaves survive the winter and lead to faster upsizing.

I already tried these tubes for training growth paths, and it turns out the 'boo happily branches out and grows leaves inside the tubes that seem super-healthy; I only took them off because the purpose of guiding growth was successful, but next year I'll put them on at half the culms and leave them there over the winter, probably putting some foam on the ends to air can get in and out but its velocity is limited. My thought is that if I can get them to survive one winter, maybe they will get hardy enough for the next one, or at least they will be around to fuel the next set of larger diameter shoots before dying.

This pic is before branch/leaf-out; I don't think I took a pic of after, but it was actually a cool effect, kinda looked like just a tube full of leaves. And when I took the tube off, the branches - which were already full length pointing up - spread out away from the main culm and now look normal.
Attachment:
Incense Bamboo 4 Weeks - Leaf out in clear tubes.jpg
Incense Bamboo 4 Weeks - Leaf out in clear tubes.jpg [ 192.2 KiB | Viewed 155 times ]

Attachment:
clear-lithonia-lighting-ceiling-light-parts-tgt12cl8-r24-64_1000.jpg
clear-lithonia-lighting-ceiling-light-parts-tgt12cl8-r24-64_1000.jpg [ 14.94 KiB | Viewed 155 times ]


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 16, 2018 9:41 pm 
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Joined: Fri Feb 12, 2016 9:06 pm
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Location: Magnolia Springs, Al Zone 8b
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Good tip, thanks. I've learned my lesson to start the watering after the temp has risen to about 37F. I have watered everyday for 2 hours soaking the pots thoroughly. Most of my leaves are gone, but the culms still look healthy.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 17, 2018 9:14 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 4:13 pm
Posts: 2782
Location: St. Louis area Location Details
danjcla wrote:
... I'm planning on doing something artistic with $5 8ft clear acrylic tubes[/url] and thick copper wire to hold the tubes upright with several culms next year, to see if that will let some culm's leaves survive the winter and lead to faster upsizing...

I know this is being discussed in two different threads, but I think you'll ultimately be disappointed by this. I suspect what you'll find is that if you do manage to get a good upsize one year, those culms will be too big to protect and they will topkill the following winter. Then you'll be back to the previous year (or two) in size, where the cycle repeats again (if you're lucky). This is how my Ph. nigra worked and it was so frustrating.

Plus you also have a year of bamboo covered in tubes and/or other types of plastic, which you will probably tire of (at least I did with tarps and plastic sheeting).

Your planting area is so small I doubt you will get thick enough growth for the plant to provide self-protection for some of its culms. Do you know where Franklin Street Park is? It's a small park between houses, and there's a decent bamboo grove there, at least there was a few years ago. Worth a look.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 19, 2018 4:52 pm 
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Location: Carmichael, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Did those of you in E TX, AL, MS etc get some low temps this week? It looked like Tampa would approach freezing.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 10:21 am 
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Location: SE TX, Zone 9a
Houston Hobby Airport saw two cold nights of 19 and 25 with a high in between of 37 degrees Fahrenheit. The first night was clear, with a wind of 10 to 15 mph. The second night had less wind with a few clouds. The National Weather Service said that this location had not been below 20 degrees since 12/22/1989, which was during the infamous catastrophic freeze in this area.

Houston Intercontinental Airport recorded 19 and 21 with a high of 39 degrees Fahrenheit in between. The last time they recorded a temperature this low was 1/8/1996, according to the National Weather Service. The cloud cover arrived later farther north.

Brazos County (USDA Zone 8b), northwest of Houston, saw temperatures between 10 and 15 degrees Fahrenheit, the coldest temperatures they have seen since December 24th, 1989.

Where I live, temperatures were about 22 and 28 degrees, with more cloud cover on the second night. Last winter I got down to 22 and 25 degrees on consecutive nights (the only freezes I had that winter), but those temperature were preceded by weeks of extremely warm weather, so many plants were actively growing. This time, most plants were somewhat dormant. I think this will matter for a lot of subtropical plants, but not necessarily bamboo. Also, last winter had calm winds and clear skies on the second night, allowing for strong radiational cooling and frost damage.

In these temperature ranges, I prefer it when the winds stay fairly high. I have found radiational cooling to be the real killer with bamboos and other subtropicals. Of course, if one is in a large heat island, they might not want to have any wind. The wind that protected me this year also caused the coldest temperatures to penetrate into the heart of Houston's heat island.

I am still assessing the damage, but there is quite a bit of winter left.... :roll:


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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 2:56 pm 
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Location: Carmichael, CA
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We will of course be interested to learn how your plants handled this, hopefully no serious damage.

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PostPosted: Sat Jan 20, 2018 3:54 pm 
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Location: Placerville California
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
we had rain yesterday and then this am 25. Besides some cold nights in the low to mid 20's this winter its been quite mild at my 3000 ft perch in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Possible snow tomorrow but that is if the storm gets here fast enough to overrun the cold air in place. Should turn to rain by tomorrow evening. It has been now 3 winter's i believe since we have seen upper teens.

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Elevation 3000 ft
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