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PostPosted: Tue Jan 30, 2018 2:33 pm 
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Location: Petersburg, IN
Thanks everyone! I'm going to wait a couple more months then place my order. Thanks for the input. I'll update with pics when I get my bamboo.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 3:32 pm 
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Location: Petersburg, IN
I'm still waiting for the weather to improve before I get moving on my bamboo plans, but today on my way in to work I saw what I think is a small stand of native giant river cane! I've driven this same route since I moved last fall and I can't believe I never noticed it! I'm going to try to get some pictures tonight on the way home. Hopefully I can find out who the land owner is and see if they would let me dig up a few shoots to transplant when the weather gets warmer.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 7:02 pm 
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Location: Petersburg, IN
Went out at lunch and got some pictures. Definitely some sort of bamboo. Can anyone confirm from this picture that it is definitely river cane?


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 13, 2018 11:32 pm 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
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Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
Sure looks like the Indiana stands of A gigantea I'm familiar with.

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Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 14, 2018 6:56 pm 
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Location: Petersburg, IN
Nice! Thanks for the verification. Hopefully they let me dig some.


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 7:02 pm 
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Location: St. Louis area Location Details
If you haven't dug bamboo before, try to get as long a rhizome length as you can.

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My blog: It's not work, it's gardening!


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PostPosted: Thu Feb 15, 2018 8:56 pm 
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Location: Petersburg, IN
Alan_L wrote:
If you haven't dug bamboo before, try to get as long a rhizome length as you can.

I haven't. Thanks for the tip, Alan!


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:37 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 5:28 am
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Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
NobeyamaGP wrote:
Went out at lunch and got some pictures. Definitely some sort of bamboo. Can anyone confirm from this picture that it is definitely river cane?

Interesting...that looks just as good as native stands of the same species growing in zone 9a in Southeast Texas. What kinds of low temperatures does this grove experience?


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 8:38 am 
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Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
NobeyamaGP wrote:
Nice! Thanks for the verification. Hopefully they let me dig some.

Try to keep the rootballs from falling apart. This is usually pretty easy, unless the soil is extremely sandy. I usually wrap small rootballs in grocery or garbage bags, and tie them pretty tightly.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 1:48 pm 
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Location: Petersburg, IN
Glen wrote:
NobeyamaGP wrote:
Went out at lunch and got some pictures. Definitely some sort of bamboo. Can anyone confirm from this picture that it is definitely river cane?

Interesting...that looks just as good as native stands of the same species growing in zone 9a in Southeast Texas. What kinds of low temperatures does this grove experience?


Thanks for the tips, Glen! This year has been pretty cold around here. In January we had 2 weeks that only got up to just below freezing for the high. The worst day had a high of 7F and a low of -7F with a wind chill closer to -20F. This grove is located in a valley between two hills next to a stream so I'd imagine it was shielded from the worst of the winds.


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PostPosted: Fri Feb 16, 2018 2:29 pm 
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I found Indiana A gigantea to be quite fussy to transplant, it did not seem to like pots and I never quite found the conditions in ground it wanted. I had a few clones at one point, not sure how many remain but none thrived. I think you'll mostly find it growing in deep sandy silt along stream banks and those are the conditions it seems to require. Most of the clones were ugly brutes, a couple were not. I think it was either Orange or Washington county where a nice stand grows on state land, the grove was split in to two different forms with an obvious dividing line - one side was around 10 feet tall with long dark green leaves, the other was around 3-4 feet tall and looked different. There did not seem to be environmental differences where the line started so I suspect it was a result of a flowering that created a couple of different clones that dominated. Just conjecture though, FoxD who may still lurk here was with me that day he may recall.

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 17, 2018 3:28 am 
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Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
According to historical accounts, Arundinaria gigantea once grew in eastern Texas in virtually impenetrable monocultures that could reach miles across, normally in bottomland soils.

Now, it is generally seen as an understory plant restricted to the edges of rivers and streams. Most colonies that I have seen are probably no more than an acre in extent.

It is easy to grow and transplant here, and it likes all the water it can get. It has no problem handling dry periods, but long term dry conditions will cause the plant to stay fairly small.

I wonder how much variability is present in this species. What I have seen in Texas all looks alike, really very similar to the pictures above from Indiana. Would the northern clones tolerate our heat, and would our southern clones handle Indiana winters?


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