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 Post subject: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 5:04 am 
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Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2016 7:19 am
Posts: 33
Location: Canada BC Creston Z6a
Is it possible to promote rhizome growth in some way? is there anything more you can do than just fertilize, or is there a specific fertilizer that can be used?


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 5:19 am 
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Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 9:14 pm
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Location: Esparto, CA
Bamboo Society Membership: ABS - America
I think that water does it.

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Brad Salmon, zone 9 Esparto, CA


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 6:30 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 20, 2006 5:28 am
Posts: 233
Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
thebambooguy wrote:
Is it possible to promote rhizome growth in some way? is there anything more you can do than just fertilize, or is there a specific fertilizer that can be used?

I have found that they usually grow in a direction opposite of the way that I want them to grow....so if you hope they grow in the wrong direction, maybe they will grow in the right direction. :D :?

Actually, in addition to water and fertilizer, bamboo loves loose soil. Years ago, I saw a presentation from a commercial bamboo grower. He plowed his field in a grid pattern and then planted Moso. After a few years, it was clear that the rhizomes had traveled vigorously down the plowed paths, while hardly growing into the unplowed areas between. Perhaps you could use this to your advantage.


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 1:50 pm 
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Location: Esparto, CA
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Were the plowed parts they favored mounded relative to the adjacent grid?

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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 7:54 pm 
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Joined: Mon Oct 31, 2016 7:19 am
Posts: 33
Location: Canada BC Creston Z6a
Glen wrote:
thebambooguy wrote:
Is it possible to promote rhizome growth in some way? is there anything more you can do than just fertilize, or is there a specific fertilizer that can be used?

I have found that they usually grow in a direction opposite of the way that I want them to grow....so if you hope they grow in the wrong direction, maybe they will grow in the right direction. :D :?

Actually, in addition to water and fertilizer, bamboo loves loose soil. Years ago, I saw a presentation from a commercial bamboo grower. He plowed his field in a grid pattern and then planted Moso. After a few years, it was clear that the rhizomes had traveled vigorously down the plowed paths, while hardly growing into the unplowed areas between. Perhaps you could use this to your advantage.


I've actually found that if you lay compost or some sort of fertilizer along where you want them to grow and make sure to water that area and not elsewhere around the plant they tend to grow that direction.

The plow part makes a lot of sense I had My black bamboo growing in my garden which was tilled really well and it shot 5-6 feet in a month so I guess I'll just do that. Thanks for the idea!


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 8:39 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:26 pm
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Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
Last year I laid down about 6 to 8 inches of wood chips in a area to the right of my madake grove where there were few to no culms. I did not add any fertilizer nor did I water the area ( it got several inches of rain during the winter rain period). During the winter I was able to see large rhizomes come to the surface then retreat down in that area. As of today I have about 10 new large culms in that area. Rhizomes will take the path of least resistance. It will move towards water and fertilizer but it will also travel where it can move without much résistance. I have done the same thing except substitute garden fines from the recycling center. Buy the way, I have not seen any new shoots yet outside the woodchip zone. Rgds


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri Apr 27, 2018 11:51 pm 
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Location: Esparto, CA
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Post hijack warning! - Fred I see your photo of Phy iridescens, does it ever have red culms leaves?

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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 5:14 am 
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Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
needmore wrote:
Were the plowed parts they favored mounded relative to the adjacent grid?

It has been a while, but if I remember correctly, no. I think something like this may have been used: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subsoiler


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Sat Apr 28, 2018 6:03 pm 
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Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
Re iridescens - culm sheaths are red for awhile and culms are temporarily dark purple around the node after the culm sheaths drop. No red leaves. The new shoots may be the most unusual of all species. Rgds


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 12:33 pm 
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Location: Ljubljana, Slovenia
Rhizomes go toward loose, fertile soil, travels towards moisture and usually towards south-east direction where the soil is usually warmer. Rhizomes rarely travel into waterlogged soil or completely shaded area on the northern side of the plant. I found it will go into compacted soil or gravel if it is warmer than nice and fertile soil on the other side that is already shaded.

Nicest and fattest shoots will always appear where you don't want them. Murphy's law of bamboo..

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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Sun Apr 29, 2018 9:37 pm 
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Joined: Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:26 pm
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Location: plus 700ft in the Santa Cruz Mtns, 8 miles from the Pacific 35 miles S. of San Jose
Many of us in the united states of gopherland have the additional problem of munched rhizomes. Watering and mulch also attracts gophers who, like bamboo, seek the soil of least resistance, but are looking for a honey hole to bamboo rhizomes. Check out "Caddyshack" for the crazy antics they inspire. I'm waiting for the "Borehole" firegun to put the issue to rest.


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Mon Apr 30, 2018 5:23 am 
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Location: Southeast Texas, Zone 9a
Tarzanus wrote:
Rhizomes go toward loose, fertile soil, travels towards moisture and usually towards south-east direction where the soil is usually warmer. Rhizomes rarely travel into waterlogged soil or completely shaded area on the northern side of the plant. I found it will go into compacted soil or gravel if it is warmer than nice and fertile soil on the other side that is already shaded.

This is not completely true in very hot and sunny climates. In Texas, it is very common for Phyllostachys to actually run toward the shade of larger trees, regardless of direction. That is also where the largest shoots are often formed. We never have a problem with soil being too cool here, so the plants tend to move into deeper and cooler soil. Compacted areas will not produce good growth, and sections of the grove that are growing on compacted soils will sometimes thin out or die during drought years.

I established a grove in a sunny area, but over the years, the plants moved into surrounding shady areas. I irrigated and fertilized the sunny area regularly, while the shady areas received neither. After several somewhat dry years, the sunny area was left with almost no live culms, and no large ones. The completely neglected shady areas continued to produce large, vigorous growth.

Tarzanus wrote:
Nicest and fattest shoots will always appear where you don't want them. Murphy's law of bamboo..

I think this phenomenon is universal!


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 Post subject: Re: Rhizome question
PostPosted: Fri May 11, 2018 7:18 am 
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Joined: Wed Oct 17, 2012 6:02 pm
Posts: 25
Location: Zone 7a Oklahoma City
Maybe it's a coincidence but rhizomes do seem to come up and run through munch when I lay down a thick layer. The problem is those rhizomes will likely die off during a bad winter and it kinda defeats the purpose for me.

As far as fertilizer goes I can't tell a freaking difference. There are some years where I dump hundreds of pounds of fertilizer and years where I get too busy and I don't use any. In the end I don't see much of a difference. It's honesty just so hard to tell.


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