Transplanting clumping rhizomes

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Andros2240
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Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by Andros2240 »

Good Morning, Here in Uruguay we are in the late spring month and approaching summer. I’ve found information on clumping bamboo is a little harder to find the running species. I would like to dig up some B.Tuldoides rhizomes and plant on a fence line to use as a wind barrier. Would These rhizome divisions have a high success rate at this time of year? Rhizome would be taken from a mature mother plant. I have taken rhizome divisions in the past but never tried in the late spring months.

My options are limited here in Uruguay and all my other bamboo plants are still in the juvenile stage. Only options for bamboo fencing plants here is B.tuldoides, B.Ventricosa and B.Oldhamii. And B.Tuldoides is the only mature species available to dig up and transplant.

Thank you
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by needmore »

Good morning, I can not say that I know the answer correctly but I would think that this is a good time if you do not have cool temperatures, if it is still cool say under 60F then maybe wait until it is warmer. You probably already know this but I would try to have one culm attached to the rhizome, you can cut it just above the lowest branch, but leave that one branch.
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
http://www.needmorebamboo.com
Andros2240
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by Andros2240 »

Thank you for the helpful knowledge, We have some around clumping bamboo species that are available to purchase here in Uruguay. B.Oldhamii, B.Tuldoides, B. Ventricosa,D.Asper, Guadua Chacoensis, Borinda Fungosa. The past 2 years I’ve been bring back plants that I’ve purchased from Tropical bamboo. This year I’ve transplanted some directly into the field and the other half are in pots. Total of 46 plants, species that seems to give me the biggest problems with transplanting is B.Chungii. I have 2 in the ground, 1 looks really good still has all its leaves and the other one has dropped all its leave and most of the small culms have died back. The other 4 Chungii’s in pots have lost all their leaves but still have green culms minus 1. Don’t know if it’s the size of the rootball. Rootball was really small during transplanting time or the fact that it is the beginning of the summer here. Also plants are bare root, no soil dipped in hydra gel. Although this year a lot of soil was still attached to plants. I was lucky because upon arrival to Uruguay customs let me leave with plants upon inspection and showing of phyto cert and import permit. These plants were only in the boxes for 2-3 days. Last year it was 2 weeks when half the plants didn’t make it.

Some of the species I’ve brought here: B. Beechyna, B. Odashimea, B. Textiles, B. Malingensis, B. Hamiltonii, B. Multiplex sp. Alphonso Karr, D. Fungonensis.
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by needmore »

It sounds like someday many people can thank you for your efforts! In 2005 I imported bamboo from Europe into the US and same as you, bare root, dipped in gel, but mine were in quarantine for 1 year before coming back to me. Now 15 years later I have none of them anymore but hope they are being traded across the US.

Nice list that you bring in, are you seeking functional species or ornamental species or both? How low do your winter temperatures get?
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
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Andros2240
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

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Both functional and ornamental. Seeing what grows best in the Uruguay climate and also 1 or 2 species where I might be pushing the zone, but can pull it off if bamboo is planted in a protected area (B. Lako and B.Vulgaris Wamin). I want to say the lowest it will get here is 27-28 C, I have B.Tuldoides and Oldhamii planted around the fence line and B. Ventricosa/ Borinda Fungosa on the damn side of a pond. It’s alot of bamboo but will look nicer than Causarina trees everyone seems to plant here. All of the bamboo will be on its 2nd and 3rd growing season.

Also plan on putting in a few lines of B.Oldhamii and D.Asper as Nursery stock and or shoot/timber production. Plants are available here in a smaller 1 liter size (starter plants) but cost is $10-$15 per plant. Seems like a good deal especially for the D.Asper.

For now I work 6 months out of the year in Northern California and spend the other 6 in Uruguay. Will be nice in a couple years to be in Uruguay full time but until than I will keep bringing in more bamboo.

Besides the species I’ve already mentioned here’s my list of bamboo I’ve imported this year.

B.Contracta, B.Dissemulator, B.emeiensis viridiflavus, B.emeiensis Flavidovirens, B.eut Viridi-vittata inversa(Asian lime balm), B.membranaceus, B.nana, B. Perv. Viridi striata, B.textilis gracilis/Glabra/kanapaha and mutabilis, B.membranaceus striata, B.dolichada striata, B. Eutuldoides Viridi-vittata (Asian lemon balm), D.Fungongensis, D.giganteus (Quail clone), D.Hamiltonii (also sp. red shoot from last year), D.Latiflorus x hamiltonii hybrid, D.asper(Betung Hitam), D.sericeus, D.maroochy.

45 plants this year, 15 are in plastic pots and the rest are planted in the ground.
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by needmore »

Great collection and great project you have, way to use your opportunity for doing this. I didn't see D minor 'Amoenis' or Nastus elatus on your list, nor any Schizostachyum, I am pleased to have all 3 of these, the Nastus in Hawai'i anyway is quite stunning the Sacred Bali here is just amazing. I think that you'll really enjoy the B nana if you get a vigorous one, I am jealious about your 2 B emiensis, I had them in CA and can not find them here, same on the B maroochy which died on me in CA and can't find it here. I'm heavy on Gigantochloa species, they are unique and I enjoy them but most seem to resent full sun and Hawai'i sun is not a hot sun.

Great price on your $15 pots!
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
http://www.needmorebamboo.com
Andros2240
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by Andros2240 »

didn't see D minor 'Amoenis' or Nastus elatus on your list, nor any Schizostachyum,

I brought a D minor ‘Amoenis’ last year but didn’t survive the trip and long wait for transplanting. Slip through the cracks this year as I do like how the culms look. Would like a Nashua elatus or a schizostachyum sacred Bali plant but I can only import Bambusa; dendrocalamus and chacoensis species, otherwise it is a lengthy process to submit other species for importing. The B Nana I have came with a 2 in diameter culm, cut above first set of branches. It looks a lot better than the plant I received last year. Already putting out new leaf buds.
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by needmore »

I wish I could import bamboo, you must not be able to import genus that are not there already. The Florida source has the best collection I've seen and I would bring in a couple dozen here if could.
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
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Andros2240
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by Andros2240 »

Sorry for the late reply, I agree with the Florida source just watching what the plants have done their first year. I’m still learning from mistakes I’ve made, potting bamboo in heavy soils, too close of spacing. A year and a half ago I planted 2 lines of b. oldhamii on 3 meter centers staggered but now am realizing one line is sufficient. Can clumping species be moved in the summer before they have started to send up shoots? New site is only 50ft away.
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Re: Transplanting clumping rhizomes

Post by needmore »

I think that when they are smaller they can be moved but when I've tried to move larger ones they were very unhappy, the last one I moved was large enough that it was difficult for me to lift the rootball but I had been very careful and got most of the roots - that one dropped most of the culms dead and was set back for a year or more.

Here I moved some smaller ones and they were just fine, the high rainfall must have helped. If they are maybe 2 meters or less and you can keep well watered maybe it will be fine but be very careful or you can lose them - rainy season best!
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
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