Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

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Saklo
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Location: S. Florida, Zone 10

Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

Post by Saklo »

Two summers ago I put a standard D. minor starter in the ground. Beginning soon after, and over the next year, it put up seven thin, bushy immature culms, at first leaners and then uprights. But this past June it kicked into gear and sprouted a half dozen mature-form culms, between 1.75" and 2" thick. All took off except one at the center of the clump, which held at 2" tall and soon got that grayish dull look. I figured it would eventually abort. But just past mid-July, with the others near to topping out (at c. 22'-24' or so, it seems) this one woke up and started growing with a purpose.

The late bloomer (rising from the lower RH corner in my photo) went from a height of 5" on 7/19 to 142.5" today, about the tallest I can still accurately measure it. What astounds me is its growth over the past 6 days -- it has climbed 90" in just that time, for -- yikes! -- about 15" per day.

I know well that timber bamboo will grow 1 foot or more daily in the tropics, but never expected to see such a pace here in southern Florida. All other culms it has put up grew 7" or 8" daily at best when their growth rate was peaking, and I thought that to be robust. Granted, with the rest of the complement now near full height the plant can concentrate on just that one shoot, but still ... Have any of you folks seen this sort of pace in tropical clumpers in the continental US, or is this more of a freak occurrence?
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needmore
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Re: Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

Post by needmore »

Nice work! No, in fact I would thus far describe my subtropical forms as being much slower to elongate shoots that the running forms so neither in CA nor here have I seen that type growth. You must be having rain?
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
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Saklo
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Re: Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

Post by Saklo »

Unlike the rest of the CONUS we've had seasonable weather here this summer: At least 3"-4" of rain fell on the clump weekly through June and July (making up for a rather dry spring) and highs have been pushing 90F.

As it happens, when I was rolling on the ground to take my arty photo yesterday, I discovered yet another shoot just barely poking up -- maybe that's why the fast-riser has gained only 10" in the day since. Last year this plant also did a June shooting cycle, and then another in late Sept.-Oct. before the rainy season ended. So I don't know if this newest culm is a June-cycle kicker, or an early start to the coming cycle or what. At any rate, I can't complain!
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needmore
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Re: Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

Post by needmore »

Looks good, you must be feeding them as well,
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
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Saklo
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Re: Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

Post by Saklo »

I've given it just a cupful of 6-1-8 palm granules three times a year so far, and thought that might actually be underdoing it a little. But also, I didn't plant it on open ground, but in a tight space -- a clump of Madagascar butterfly palms to one side, and Dracaena on the other, both 25 feet tall and initially close enough together to canopy over the planting spot. I've been gradually cutting back the palm and dumbcane stems to give it more room and light, but I think some plants have enough "situational awareness" to strategize their growth, so maybe it's been sensing the competition and responding accordingly.
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needmore
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Re: Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

Post by needmore »

Looks like they are quite happy, mine in northern CA did very well and reached 2” diameter in year 2. Here my young one has been focusing on multiple shoots with a modest upsize so soon I bet it leaps in size.
Brad Salmon, zone 12B Kea'au, HI
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todbranson
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Re: Dendrocalamus minor supergrowth

Post by todbranson »

Saklo wrote: Wed Aug 11, 2021 10:04 pm Two summers ago I put a standard D. minor starter in the ground. Beginning soon after, and over the next year, it put up seven thin, bushy immature culms, at first leaners and then uprights. But this past June it kicked into gear and sprouted a half dozen mature-form culms, between 1.75" and 2" thick. All took off except one at the center of the clump, which held at 2" tall and soon got that grayish dull look. I figured it would eventually abort. But just past mid-July, with the others near to topping out (at c. 22'-24' or so, it seems) this one woke up and started growing with a purpose.

The late bloomer (rising from the lower RH corner in my photo) went from a height of 5" on 7/19 to 142.5" today, about the tallest I can still accurately measure it. What astounds me is its growth over the past 6 days -- it has climbed 90" in just that time, for -- yikes! -- about 15" per day.

I know well that timber bamboo will grow 1 foot or more daily in the tropics, but never expected to see such a pace here in southern Florida. All other culms it has put up grew 7" or 8" daily at best when their growth rate was peaking, and I thought that to be robust. Granted, with the rest of the complement now near full height the plant can concentrate on just that one shoot, but still ... Have any of you folks seen this sort of pace in tropical clumpers in the continental US, or is this more of a freak occurrence?
It looks awesome... I love it...
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